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Pennsylvania Tableau

 

First Shot

 

Photograph your deer. The best shots are often taken before field-dressing your kill. We recommend it. In most cases, you may want to reposition the deer to be in the best light, to be on clean ground or snow, or to make it look more natural. If the deer’s tongue is hanging outside its mouth, push it back. In most cases, you may want to reposition the deer. Wipe clean from the body any debris or excess blood visible to the camera. Calibrate the aperture, make it look more natural. Be in best light. Reposition the photograph. Your deer.

 

Second Shot

 

Photograph your deer. We recommend taking a shot while field-dressing your kill. In most cases, you may want to reposition your deer to lie on even terrain. Clear of rocks, trees, debris. Michigan hunters save one or two sticks. More natural. We don’t recommend it. In most cases, you may want to cut upward. Anus to sternum. Calibrate the aperture. Wipe clean from the body the body. Reposition the viscera, make it look less visible to the camera. Be on clean ground or snow, be in natural light. Photograph. Your deer. Push it back.

 

Third Shot

 

Photograph your deer. We recommend a finishing shot of the body. Michigan hunters hang their deer head up, tail down. We don’t recommend it. Hang your deer with its head down. Hang your deer high enough. Out of reach. Animals, pets, children. Push it back. Make sure air circulates through the chest cavity. Natural. Michigan hunters wedge one or two sticks sideways in the chest cavity. In most cases, this doesn’t look natural. Wipe clean. Reposition. Calibrate the aperture. Your deer. Spoils at ambient temperatures over fifty degrees. Be in little to no light.




Jack Snyder